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How to Break-Off in Snooker

How to play snookerSnooker has a lot in common with billiard and is played in a similar kind of large table like billiard which is generally 5ft by 10 ft. A snooker break off shot is what sets the tone of the game.

 

Knowing how to break off in snooker as a beginner can influence the game enough to make you a winner. Once you learn the trick it is advisable to use the style when you play in future.

 

For a new player it is important to know how to break off in snooker and it may not be possible to take a snooker break off shot like a professional.

 

For a beginner it would be advisable if the outside red is aimed for which is at the rear end of the triangle. You should come back to the same table side from where the strike was made at the cue ball to a point which is near to green or yellow. This of course depends on the side of the baulk line on which the cue ball rested.

 

This action will make sure that your ball would not go off into one of the top pockets. Once you understand the effect of the side then you can adopt professional snooker break-off shot.

 

While learning how to break off in snooker some players feel more comfortable to break off from the left hand side as they feel this is a safer break off point. They also have in mind the opponent who they feel is going to feel uncomfortable playing safety shots from the yellow corner than the corner having green.

 

Being this the first snooker break off shot it is common to hit the end red. Few players sometime intend to take on the second red which opens up the pack more. If you strive to get the cue ball tight on the baulk cushion it might give you advantage as your opponent would find it difficult to take the safety shot. 

 

Play better snookerWhile learning how to break off in snooker you must realize that you will lose advantage if your second red is caught too thin.

 

This is because in a snooker break off shot the cue ball will touch the end red which will push it to a corner pocket or give advantage to your opponent and put him/her in a good position for a break.

 

The shot might go in-off or in the corner pockets if your cue ball is caught too thick.

 

Take a good snooker break off shot by hitting the end red. This is almost a professional shot. This shot most of the time doesn’t go wrong and it will get your opponent into a tight spot.

 

If you make a good break off shot your opponent will have a difficult time to square it off. If you play a moderate shot your opponent will have to play rather well to put you into trouble.

 

Learning how to break off in snooker you should take one advice that not to hit the blue. Your snooker break off shot should have enough side to give angles to the cue ball which will make sure that it will not touch the blue ball.

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